The ONE Point

If Jesus realized that a point may be seen as a “beginning” or as an “interval,” but not as a defined whole, line or interval, then the question became: how many “beginnings” or “intervals,” which may be symbolized as (o), are necessary to define a point or to give it “actual being”? – that is, not to define the operative positive force itself, which may be said to correspond to the vertical line bisecting the horizontal diameter of a circle, but to define one point in the circle that the cross enfolds? Or, the equation may be put, simply: how many “intervals” (o) are required to draw the configuration of the positive sign (+), which appears as answer to the problem of the product of zero divided, and also defines a point?

Five “intervals,” (o), are the fewest that will satisfy this situation:

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The number five, itself a spherical number, completely “houses” the one point defined. If five is the “measure” of one, defined, one cannot measure the same in every direction: in the figure above, both the vertical and the horizontal line “count” three intervals, but if they are “taken apart” one line will “inventory” more intervals than the other.

…The two smallest segments of a line that can exhibit one degree of difference and move to completely secure and reinforce one “corpuscle of light” must measure three intervals (o) in one segment, two “intervals” (o) in the other. As the three-interval segment moves perpendicular to the two-interval segment, the two-interval segment may divide and close against the three-interval segment as it passes through, thus securing and reinforcing its center point. This action may be symbolized:

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Both segments perfectly share and equally sustain the one-interval that becomes a “corpuscle of light.”

Until next time, peace.

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