Jesus’ Robe of Light

To finish up Chapter 8, Preston Harold discusses one of the often overlooked but strangely appealing aspects of the Gospel: Jesus’ robe. He takes us on a journey to understanding the deep meaning of this single-pieced garment, for which four Roman soldiers cast lots at His feet during the crucifixion.

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Jesus appears to have seen that…within (the cross) is held the quintessence of being, light, one-point defined; thus through cross-action one is triumphant. It should come as no surprise, but it does, to see that Jesus created the symbol to indicate that as men began to “handle” light and to try to elucidate its secret, they would come upon an indivisible whole, one, which would so elude them as they labored within the confines of a “four-dimensional” concept that they would resort to a “game of chance” to try to possess its secret. This symbol of wholeness and this drama may be observed at the foot of the cross, where soldiers cast lots for his robe.

…Scientists play their game of chance because when numbers are large, “chance is the best warrant for certainty.” It is when number is small, specifically when they confront one, h, that the number, four, is seen to be inadequate to deal with the quantum, a unity that appears to be “outside the oyster of Space and Time.” This indivisible piece bespeaks another dimension that somehow transcends the four-dimensional concept – bespeaks another dimension which, like TAO:

…”covers the ten thousand things like a garment” but does not claim to be master over them…

This, the “fifth-dimension,” may be likened to the all-encompassing, seamless unity of a single reality covering life like a garment woven in one piece, as was Jesus’ robe, the robe of Light.

Then the soldiers, when they had crucified Jesus, took his garments, and made four parts, to every soldier a part; and also his coat: now the coat was without seam, woven from the top throughout. –John 19:23-24

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And how did the soldiers decide who would keep the robe, the fifth garment? Like our modern-day scientists they played a game of chance; they cast lots. Which soldier received the robe is not important, the point is that the robe could not be divided. When dealing with the undividable fifth dimension, wholeness and chance are inevitable.

Observant readers of the Gospels will also recognize the higher, fifth-dimension significance of Jesus’ robe in the story of the healing of the woman with the issue of blood who need only touch Jesus’ robe for the cure, and when Jesus’ robe became as white as the light at his transfiguration on Mt. Tabor.

We’ll begin Chapter 9 in the next post. Until then, peace.

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5 thoughts on “Jesus’ Robe of Light

    1. Hi Sylvia. Thanks for your comment. Yes, there will be more coming in 2018! I’m glad you are enjoying the journey with Preston Harold’s The Shining Stranger. Stay tuned and thanks for reading…

      1. Sylvia says:

        Thank you! I’m just really blown away by the amount of work and commitment this blog must have taken, let alone the topic which is not light and easy to present! It’s making it a lot easier for me to get through the book with your explanations and examples, before I read it myself. And I’m very grateful to you for being introduced to it . It resonates perfectly with everything I’ve been guessing on this subject, but being mostly an artist, I never got the scientific side of it so well before. All the best to you, and a very good next year !

  1. I read this post awhile back. Pondering a lot. Today I looked on youtube the first video of a list, hosted by Matt Presti, titled TEC, the secret of light series ( copy/paste not working ). The video is an introduction to the cosmology of Walter and Lao Russell. Touching that light is a total reversal of the prevailing belief system. It cannot be divided, because it is the underlying of the whole known universe.
    A new door opens for me. Thank you, I am looking forward to your next blog !

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