Jesus Loves Statistics

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In Weaver’s theory of communication, one part only receives source noise. The message is changed into a signal by the transmitter and the receiver is an inverse transmitter, changing the transmitted signal back into a message. Noise plays the role of good and evil, increasing uncertainty, but if uncertainty is increased, then information is increased. Weaver says, however, “Uncertainty which arises by virtue of freedom of choice on the part of the sender is desirable uncertainty. Uncertainty which arises because of errors or because of the influence of noise, is undesirable uncertainty… Language must be designed (or developed) with a view to the totality of things that man may wish to say; but not being able to accomplish everything….it too should deal with its task statistically.”

Jesus understood this statistical strategy. Preston Harold tells us…

As Jesus describes the way He deals with the task of “telling us all things,” the term, “statistically,” comes to mind – that is, He scatters His words widely, knowing that some will fall on “stony soil,” but that some will fall on “good soil,” will take root and grow in the minds of men. This statistical dealing with words, which He also involves with the working of the “kingdom of God,” as well as His involving communication with a certain redundancy which man now knows to be necessary and to be involved with entropy, and His saying that the “kingdom of God” and its working grows into a “tree so large” that its reach is lost to physical measurement, that it harbors or involves the “bits” of sound that birds, poetically, represent, indicates that Jesus was indeed referring to the working of the second law of thermodynamics in His descriptions of the realm or reign of God.

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Ah, back to the second law of thermodynamics. Entropy strikes again! The end of the universe – heat death – meaninglessness. Is there any way forward? What say you, Mr. Harold?

As far as the universe is concerned, there is desirable uncertainty in the postulations of scientists as to when its “heat-death” will occur. For twentieth-century man the hour appears comfortably distant, so distant the matter can be of no concern only to one who so loves life that the idea is dismaying. Nevertheless, he must face it, for the physicists tell him it appears quite certain that energy is constantly transferred from the available to the unavailable state, and transfer in the opposite direction never occurs in nature. This brings cosmology into the discussion and returns this study to the point in question – Jesus’ answer as to the real nature of entropic working and its meaning in universal terms.

The “real nature of entropic working?” Could there be some sort of “out” to this unassailable concept of the inevitable, ultimate outworking of entropy? We’ll see what The Shining Stranger has to say about this beginning in our next post. Until then, peace.

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