Jesus’ Robe of Light

To finish up Chapter 8, Preston Harold discusses one of the often overlooked but strangely appealing aspects of the Gospel: Jesus’ robe. He takes us on a journey to understanding the deep meaning of this single-pieced garment, for which four Roman soldiers cast lots at His feet during the crucifixion.

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Jesus appears to have seen that…within (the cross) is held the quintessence of being, light, one-point defined; thus through cross-action one is triumphant. It should come as no surprise, but it does, to see that Jesus created the symbol to indicate that as men began to “handle” light and to try to elucidate its secret, they would come upon an indivisible whole, one, which would so elude them as they labored within the confines of a “four-dimensional” concept that they would resort to a “game of chance” to try to possess its secret. This symbol of wholeness and this drama may be observed at the foot of the cross, where soldiers cast lots for his robe.

…Scientists play their game of chance because when numbers are large, “chance is the best warrant for certainty.” It is when number is small, specifically when they confront one, h, that the number, four, is seen to be inadequate to deal with the quantum, a unity that appears to be “outside the oyster of Space and Time.” This indivisible piece bespeaks another dimension that somehow transcends the four-dimensional concept – bespeaks another dimension which, like TAO:

…”covers the ten thousand things like a garment” but does not claim to be master over them…

This, the “fifth-dimension,” may be likened to the all-encompassing, seamless unity of a single reality covering life like a garment woven in one piece, as was Jesus’ robe, the robe of Light.

Then the soldiers, when they had crucified Jesus, took his garments, and made four parts, to every soldier a part; and also his coat: now the coat was without seam, woven from the top throughout. –John 19:23-24

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And how did the soldiers decide who would keep the robe, the fifth garment? Like our modern-day scientists they played a game of chance; they cast lots. Which soldier received the robe is not important, the point is that the robe could not be divided. When dealing with the undividable fifth dimension, wholeness and chance are inevitable.

Observant readers of the Gospels will also recognize the higher, fifth-dimension significance of Jesus’ robe in the story of the healing of the woman with the issue of blood who need only touch Jesus’ robe for the cure, and when Jesus’ robe became as white as the light at his transfiguration on Mt. Tabor.

We’ll begin Chapter 9 in the next post. Until then, peace.

Four Dimensions

Picking up where we last left off, our dilemma of the three and four continues into the realm of mathematics. Preston Harold explains:

In the mathematician’s view, the physicist deals with four continua, or – more precisely – with four dimensions. In geometry, four dimensions would mean that one has four independent directions. For example, this could be seen by drawing four lines through a given point, all perpendicular to the others. In this narrow sense the universe has only three dimensions. The mathematicians extended the concept of dimensions to any situation where events can be described by independent coordinates, and where certain simple laws hold. In this broader sense Einstein found it convenient to use four independent coordinates, with time playing the role of a fourth dimension. In pure mathematics, as well as in its applications to physics, it is often convenient to use many more dimensions, even infinitely many.

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But the idea of wholeness, or of continua itself, as one dimension greater than any number of dimensions has not broken through the tetragrammaton – through the confines of four. For example, Einstein speaks of the “bold” interpretation of the modern quantum theory associated with de Broglie, Schrodinger, Dirac, and Born – he says their interpretation “is logically unobjectionable and has important successes to its credit. Unfortunately, however, it compels one to use a continuum the number of whose dimensions is not that ascribed to space by physics hitherto (four) but rises indefinitely with the number of the particles constituting the system under consideration.”

For how long does the number not ascribed to space rise? Is it infinite? Jesus will have something to teach us here but before we get to him, we will detour into the world of music.

Until next time, peace.