The Cross as Mathematical Solution

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When all of Jesus’ statements are applied mathematically, and when one considers the full import of His presenting the cross (+), the positive sign, as His symbol and all-embracing answer it would appear that His mathematical concepts moved beyond those of His day, and that He attempted to describe the reality of the operation of the energy that mathematics attempts to describe…this study poses His words against the concepts of Nicomachus of Gerasa…both He and Nicomachus use “father and son,” and “teacher and pupil,” to symbolize “greater and the lesser,” or the concept of opposites, unequal; but in Jesus’ concept these opposites meet and are reconciled in the unity of one, or sameness.

Here Preston Harold describes the similarities between the teachings of Jesus and Nicomachus, striking as they are. But whereas Nicomachus writes that “when a point is added to a point, it makes no increase, for when a non-dimensional thing is added to another non-dimensional thing, it will thereby not have dimension…,” Jesus took another point of view.

This is to say, when the cross (+) as symbol and all-embracing answer is applied to the problem of “sum of nothing added to nothing,” it would say that Jesus did not overlook the word added – the symbol (+) introduces the problem of organization, or, as Eddington put it, of “and.” The cross as answer indicates that there cannot be a “non-dimensional thing,” –or, one might say, until a point has dimension or until it is defined, a point is not a point: the cross has dimension and it also defines a point, or gives a point dimension. The cross (+) as answer and symbol calls forth the concept of negative (-) and positive (+) numbers.

Harold now goes onto describe how one becomes itself the unit of measure when seen in contrast with zero. It shifts in its capacity from a mere digit to an active function, from a noun to a verb.

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In the view of this study, Jesus realized that the correspondence between one and the whole, zero, and between one and each other ensuing digit, differing only by one, makes of one, measure itself. This is to say, one is not merely a unique digit: it is, rather, a principle, or action involving opposites, “minus-one” and “plus-one,” upon which the whole operates. Thus, Jesus saw that in the definition of one as an operative principle, the definition of the underlying principle upon which one and all operate could be grasped. And as Jesus examined His own mind the “sum of nothing added to nothing,” which must perforce involve the division of “nothing,” or the whole or zero, the positive (+), the cross, arose as the only possible answer to the problem of “naught divided by naught.” This, because the problem itself is posed in terms  that may be seen only as a negative divided by a negative which produces a positive answer. Or, one might say, that if through use of zero-0-an infinite increase in number may be drawn, then unlike the number one, when zero multiplies itself it produces more than itself: it must forever reproduce itself plus.

Until next time, peace.

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Jesus the Mathematician?

We now begin to look at Jesus’ ministry in quite a unique, “unorthodox” way; as that of a mathematician. Rest assured, when one considers how often Jesus used the number “one” as a part of his teachings, one must wonder at his mathematical knowledge.

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Jesus has never been considered a mathematician. He made but few statements dealing with number. Yet, He made many statements about one, the number that is the basis of arithmetic through which all branches of mathematics become possible. If He described one’s inner structure and the principle upon which one, as measure, operates, He was a mathematical genius. How could this come from the man of Nazareth?

How indeed? At this point I am reminded of the 12 year-old Jesus amazing those present in the Jerusalem temple with his questions, answers, and understanding. From where does his wisdom come?

The realization could have arisen from His unconscious, as has been the case with other great mathematicians. Jung felt that a fruitful field for further investigation was the study of man’s basic “mathematical axiomata – which Pauli calls ‘primary mathematical intuitions,’ and among which he especially mentions the ideas of an infinite series of numbers in arithmetic, or of a continuum in geometry, etc.” Dr. von Franz writes that “William James once pointed out ‘the idea of an unconscious could itself be compared to the ‘field’ concept in physics.’” She says:

“In other words, our conscious representations are sometimes ordered (or arranged in a pattern) before they have become conscious to us. The 18th century German mathematician Karl Friedrich Gauss gives an example of an experience of such an unconscious order of ideas: he says that he found a certain rule in the theory of numbers, “not by painstaking research, but by the Grace of God, so to speak. The riddle solved itself as lightning strikes, and I myself could not tell or show the connection between what I knew before, what I last used to experiment with, and what produced the final success.”

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Keeping in mind that for Harold, the Father dwells in the unconscious, and that Jesus “can only do what he sees his Father doing, because whatever the Father does the Son does also,” and “My Father is working until this hour, and I am also working,” and one can clearly see that Jesus is receiving his mathematical revelations from his unconscious, or Father. But is this the only explanation for his mathematical genius? We will look at other possibilities in our next installment. Until then, peace.