Jesus Loves Statistics

canstockphoto6969679

In Weaver’s theory of communication, one part only receives source noise. The message is changed into a signal by the transmitter and the receiver is an inverse transmitter, changing the transmitted signal back into a message. Noise plays the role of good and evil, increasing uncertainty, but if uncertainty is increased, then information is increased. Weaver says, however, “Uncertainty which arises by virtue of freedom of choice on the part of the sender is desirable uncertainty. Uncertainty which arises because of errors or because of the influence of noise, is undesirable uncertainty… Language must be designed (or developed) with a view to the totality of things that man may wish to say; but not being able to accomplish everything….it too should deal with its task statistically.”

Jesus understood this statistical strategy. Preston Harold tells us…

As Jesus describes the way He deals with the task of “telling us all things,” the term, “statistically,” comes to mind – that is, He scatters His words widely, knowing that some will fall on “stony soil,” but that some will fall on “good soil,” will take root and grow in the minds of men. This statistical dealing with words, which He also involves with the working of the “kingdom of God,” as well as His involving communication with a certain redundancy which man now knows to be necessary and to be involved with entropy, and His saying that the “kingdom of God” and its working grows into a “tree so large” that its reach is lost to physical measurement, that it harbors or involves the “bits” of sound that birds, poetically, represent, indicates that Jesus was indeed referring to the working of the second law of thermodynamics in His descriptions of the realm or reign of God.

70d134cbf56d33dfacd1b2a16e1c5e44--biblical-art-pentecost

Ah, back to the second law of thermodynamics. Entropy strikes again! The end of the universe – heat death – meaninglessness. Is there any way forward? What say you, Mr. Harold?

As far as the universe is concerned, there is desirable uncertainty in the postulations of scientists as to when its “heat-death” will occur. For twentieth-century man the hour appears comfortably distant, so distant the matter can be of no concern only to one who so loves life that the idea is dismaying. Nevertheless, he must face it, for the physicists tell him it appears quite certain that energy is constantly transferred from the available to the unavailable state, and transfer in the opposite direction never occurs in nature. This brings cosmology into the discussion and returns this study to the point in question – Jesus’ answer as to the real nature of entropic working and its meaning in universal terms.

The “real nature of entropic working?” Could there be some sort of “out” to this unassailable concept of the inevitable, ultimate outworking of entropy? We’ll see what The Shining Stranger has to say about this beginning in our next post. Until then, peace.

Advertisements

Time Maps: Part III

Finishing up our “Time Maps” installments, we continue with how the words of Jesus interpret the time maps Preston Harold has drawn for us.

Being asked by the Pharisees when the kingdom of God would come, [Jesus] answered them and said the kingdom of God comes not with observation, nor will people say “Here it is!” or “There it is!” because the kingdom of God is in your midst. –Luke 17:20-21

Consciousness in man is attached to a material body and thus consciousness can take him only into a concept of absolute future. But man’s kingdom, the unconscious domain, is located “absolutely elsewhere” in relation to consciousness’ space-time frame; thus he does not have to “go” anywhere to enter this kingdom here-now within him, and thus he is with God and all things are possible to him: he is constantly passing through the “eye of a needle,” through the now, which is absolute unto himself only, for there “is no absolute Now, but only the various relative Nows differing according to the reckoning of different observers…”

Figure3

No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten Son who is in the bosom of the Father has declared Him.

–John 1:18

Eddington calls “Absolute Elsewhere” the neutral zone. God being the only “Absolute Esewhere” man can conceive of makes of Him a neutral event man cannot observe because he is taking place through and within God being – just as a child is taking place through a woman “with child” and the embryo cannot observe her as an event or form, and she cannot intervene in the natural process that causes him to be brought forth through her body and being. In this process, man becomes an event in himself, a biological event, his flesh antientropic although the random element is increased with every move he makes, pointing time’s arrow for consciousness as the unconscious calculates the hour.

 Figure4

Here we encounter a concept that can revolutionize the way we see the world: that humankind, each person, is an event, a verb. Not a noun, a dead product of thought, a mere “thing,” but a process, an activity, a living movement. And if humans are created in the image of God, then God must be a verb as well.

In our next post we will look a bit closer at what the word “random” might really mean. Until then, peace.

Time Maps: Part II

Preston Harold now describes his time diagrams from the standpoint of Jesus’ words. He gives us a brief introduction:

The diagrams are not to be taken as more than a token – a token idea is all that can be given. Therefore, if an ancient’s pure thought grasped the truth of time in all it’s complexity, his revelation of it must bespeak such as is beyond man’s comprehension in its entirety; and since time is so involved with space and with a body traveling through space, the ancient’s statement could not at first glance appear to be related directly to the mystery of time.

Once again, Harold reminds us that the ancients didn’t have modern scientific concepts on to which to build their revelations. Poetry was their means of transmission. Now, onto the main event…

“It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God…With men it is impossible, but not with God: for with God all things are possible.” –Mark 10:25

 Figure2

Look now at Figure 2. It shows, poetically speaking, that “I, myself” am being drawn through the “eye of a needle” – and when the drawings are understood, it would appear that it is more difficult for “me” to enter “Absolute Elsewhere” which the “eye of the needle” involves (see Figure 4) than it is for a camel to go through a tiny hole.

 Figure4

Consider that if a man possesses the kingdom of God within him, he is rich – and as Jesus depicts true wealth, He, Himself, is rich indeed. Thus, His words must pertain to “how I locate events in my frame” as He presents in words a form that looks like a “circle,” the eye of a needle, which it is possible for “a rich man” to be drawn through, if God draws him, and by a force which is “heaven knows what” – time.

Please also note in Harold’s diagrams that the symbol in the middle of the circle for the “Here-Now” experience is a cross.

Figure1

Harold continues…

“Absolute Elsewhere” provides “room” for the concept of the unconscious, for an eternal abode of the Father who alone knows the secret of time, and who in relation to the possibility of man’s seeing Him must be absolutely elsewhere – thus, all one can see of Him is to be seen in God-consciousness in man’s here-now being.

One here is reminded of last verse of the Prologue to the Gospel of John – “No one has ever seen God. It is God the only Son, who is close to the Father’s heart who has made Him known.” John 1:18

Jesus’ strange word-picture suggests a large mass being drawn through a tiny opening – by means of this contradiction, He indicates poetically that the actual mass of matter is no more than a speck in comparison to what it appears to be. Scientists now confirm this.

And who knew that Jesus taught at light speed?!

Eddington says, “As the speed of matter approaches the speed of light its mass increases to infinity, and therefore it is impossible to make matter travel faster than light.” Jesus made Himself a symbol of light, He poetically “sets the pace” at which a material body may travel: He was called “teacher” and “Lord” – thus, when He says that the scholar is not above his teacher nor the servant above his lord, enough that they fare alike, He restricts the pace to His own, light’s speed.

Move over Millenium Falcon, Jesus is in the passing lane! We’ll finish up our “time maps” installments in the next post. Until then, peace.

The Test of a Poet

Albert Einstein believed that the creative principle itself resides in mathematics and in his “Essays in Science” he says, “In a certain sense, therefore, I hold it true that pure thought can grasp reality, as the ancients dreamed.”

einstein

Preston Harold asks:

If the pure thought of an ancient led him to realize that there is but a single reality – all manifestation of matter, mind, and energy but different aspects of it – and if he grasped the nature and significance of its supreme law so that he must state the entropy concept as it relates to time, as it works within the universe, how would the ancient have done it? He could speak as a poet, using simple words fully…

From what we read of Jesus in the gospels (especially the synoptics), he certainly knew how to use simple words to their maximum effect, distilling the principles he was espousing with breath-taking economy. Within Jesus’ simple words, though, we find infinite meaning if we have the ears to hear.

jesus

Many of the passages reporting Jesus’ teaching are as profoundly beautiful as a poem and as complex as the equation concerning the generation of waves by wind that Eddington presents. Others, such as “The kingdom of God is within you,” are as profoundly simple as Einstein’s famous E=mc squared. Can a poet express truly, albeit symbolically, abstract concepts such as are enfolded in a mathematical formula?… Jesus must meet the most severe test of a poet in describing the many aspects of the second law of thermodynamics and its significance. A poetic statement indicating that energy operates always in changing arrangement resulting in increased measure is found in two of Jesus’ enigmatic remarks about the working of God.

It is these two remarks of Jesus we will look at in our next installment. Until then, peace.

Reconciling Science and Religion, PART 2

SecondLaw

Second Law of Thermodynamics – Increased Entropy
“The Second Law of Thermodynamics is commonly known as the Law of Increased Entropy. While quantity remains the same (First Law), the quality of matter/energy deteriorates gradually over time. How so? Usable energy is inevitably used for productivity, growth and repair. In the process, usable energy is converted into unusable energy. Thus, usable energy is irretrievably lost in the form of unusable energy. 

“Entropy” is defined as a measure of unusable energy within a closed or isolated system (the universe for example). As usable energy decreases and unusable energy increases, “entropy” increases. Entropy is also a gauge of randomness or chaos within a closed system. As usable energy is irretrievably lost, disorganization, randomness and chaos increase.”

-From AllAboutScience.org

Today, the supreme law, the “iron law,” in the physical world is seen to be the second law of thermodynamics. But it gives rise to a view of the universe and entropy’s meaning that is seriously questioned by many experts in various fields who suggest, indeed insist, that this law is correct insofar as it is stated, but that as yet it is incompletely stated or its meaning is misunderstood.

The second law of thermodynamics began to come into being with the first theory of the conversion of heat into mechanical work in the early 19th century. Rudolf Clausius was the first person to formulate the second law in 1850. Yet Jesus intimated the law poetically, from an inner aspect, in his teachings:

Jesus spoke of an “iron law”-that is, of a law that could not fail, and He indicated that all in creation is involved with and rests upon its operation. In the view of this study, He realized that man cannot understand himself until he also understands the natural universe of which he is a part and in which life manifests itself. He saw that in the psychic working of man a parallel to nature’s supreme law operates, and he described this operation in His descriptions of the workings of the kingdom of God, setting forth what might be called “secondary psychic law” as well as describing in poetic terms the most important of the secondary laws of physics. The “secondary psychic law” He enuncidated complements the law of Moses, which Jesus upheld, and forces a synthesis or the higher law of love when it operates in conjunction with the Ten Commandments.

Let’s look at some quotes from Jesus on the idea of law:

The law and the prophets were until John: since that time the kingdom of God is preached, and every man presseth into it. And it is easier for heaven and earth to pass, than one tittle of the law to fail.

-Luke 16:16-17

Think not that I am come to destroy the law or the prophets: I am not come to destroy, but to fulfill. For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth pass, not one jot or tittle shall in no wise pass from the law until all be fulfilled.

–Matthew 5:17-18

JesusLaw

Preston Harold continues:

Jesus did not come to destroy the promise of the high ethic inherent in Jewish law…He came to fulfill this promise which flowered in his teaching… But his words must have referred to more and something other than the mass of rules and regulations which comprised “the law” of His day, upon which time’s accretions bore heavily. For having said, “Whosoever therefore shall break one of these least commandments, and shall teach men so, he shall be called least in the kingdom of heaven,” Jesus, Himself, repudiated more than a “jot and tittle” of the Jewish law… In short, Jesus sets up so large a contradiction as regards “the law” of which He spoke in conjunction with the working of the kingdom of God that one must seek beyond the explanation of His upholding Mosaic law to find the full and deepest meaning of His words. Not until one compares His descriptions of the working of the kingdom of God with descriptions of the operation of the second law of thermodynamics, as will be done in the following chapter, does the parallel between the two concepts become apparent, albeit Jesus’ description is poetical.

But before we move on to the next chapter, we will make a brief detour to explore how Jesus’ teachings reflect the scientific working of light. Until next time, peace.

Jesus: Life’s True Artist

Preston Harold takes us through Jesus’ approach to life; what He sees as essential to having life in abundance. In a private correspondence Henry Miller once wrote: “It’s not that I put the sage or saint above the artist. It’s rather that I want to see established the ‘artist of life.’ The Christ resurrected would be such, for example.”

Harold says…

No theology, acting on command of or by the example Jesus set, may prescribe a stern approach to life, prohibiting eating and drinking of any food of liquid except on the ground that it is offensive to the one partaking of it; what offends one must be cast out of his life, but nothing that enters a man defiles him. Jesus was called glutton and drunkard. He did not deny that He ate and drank as He chose – He stated that wisdom vindicates ascetic or nonascetic practices:

For John the Baptist has come, eating no bread and drinking no wine, and you say, “He has a devil”; the Son of man has come eating and drinking, and you say, “Here is a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of taxgatherers and sinners!” Nevertheless, Wisdom is vindicated by all her children. –Luke 7:33

Cana

Jesus provided wine at the wedding of Cana… The teaching and practice of Jesus, however, does not invite drunkenness or gluttony. He teaches that there is nothing in life that cannot be used to further its joy and abundance when man has learned to control himself.

The richness of life must be leavened, and Jesus says the working or coming of the kingdom of God is leavening it. He saw that men must grasp the art of play:

To what then shall I compare the men of this generation? What are they like? Like children sitting in the marketplace and calling to one another, “We piped to you and you would not dance, we lamented and you would not weep.            –Luke 7:31,32

Music and voices call men into action – life calls, nature calls: dance, laugh, weep, join us!

Jesus_Goes_Up_Alone_onto_a_Mountain_to_Pray_(Jésus_monte_seul_sur_une_montagne_pour_prier)_-_James_Tissot_-_overall

Jesus reveled in nature. Any living thing was precious to him. He sought the open beauty of mountains and sea, the solitude of far places. He came also to the cities, the marketplace, the feasts, and to the temple. He allowed the extravagant. He aided the poor, but He did not extol the mean bone of poverty. He respected the Sabbath, but employed it to His own pursuits. He despised exhibitions of piety, vain repetitions, brutality and self-debasement. His was a total empathy, a compassionate rendering, an exquisite edition of the art of life.

Beautifully stated! But then comes a wrench in the spokes:

Jesus knew the very glory of life – knew that even the stones would shout it, if men did not. And yet, the Gospel of St. John presents an enormous contradiction as regards Jesus’ love of life in this world. He says:

He that loveth his life shall lose it; and he that hateth this life in this world shall keep it unto life eternal. -John 12:25

Against these words are posed the example He set and the statement that He came “not to judge the world,” but that man might have life abundantly… What then could Jesus have meant [by this contradicition]?

It is this we will tackle in our next post. Until then, peace…

The Tower of Babel and the Mystery of Language: Part II

Image

What is the reason that the Tower of Babel cannot be finished? What is the legend trying to tell us?

Consider that each man speaks a language of his own begot of his understanding of any word. Where his understanding stops, or veers off in tangent, the babble of words falling upon his inner or outer ear serve only to confuse the issue and disperse the force of those who strive to control his thinking. Thus, he can be conditioned so far and no further – no utopian dream can permanently adjust him to Homo sapiens’ insufficient lot in life: the tower cannot be finished because man, himself, is not finished. Man is only partially conscious, his body is an expression of mind power only partially in use; and powerful as it is, the subconscious is not the end of his being.

The subconscious is constantly trying to make itself the distinctive, identifying factor of the human being, attempting to “reach heaven” on its own while overriding the Authority-Ego’s proper administration.

Dr. Rolf Alexander likens the subconscious to a factory that needs an over-all understanding to direct andImage coordinate the know-how of each laborer. But he sees that the “factory” does not identify the man: “Search as we will, we can never find the reality we all hunger for in the conditioned illusions of our subconscious, nor in our intellects which are oriented to these illusions….we must return to the task of developing the instrument of conscious perception abandoned by us in childhood – the true personality.” This echoes Jesus: one must become as a child to receive his name, to enter the kingdom of God within him.

But even though the subconscious is trying to override its proper jurisdiction, it is still a necessary part of the picture; life is impossible without it:

If one accepts the teaching of Jesus as revelation of the Authority-Ego in man operating from the unconscious domain, then one accepts the concept that the over-all understanding to direct and coordinate the subconscious is there; and that the yoke of the subconscious mind has been assumed by Self in order to enter life through nature’s avenues, for nature appears to operate the animal kingdom through a subconscious, mechanistic process – that is, through converting experience into instinctive, conditioned responses.

Jesus indicates that the Authority-Ego has willingly taken this yoke upon Self because through the subconscious mind’s working, the burden of accumulated knowledge is carried easily; because of it man learns rapidly; and it relieves him of the operation of his mechanistic body. As symbol of Authority-Ego, Jesus
says to the ego-group: 

Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me…

For my yoke is easy and my burden is light…

Image

These words and the Babel legend indicate that man need not fear the hold his subconscious mind has upon consciousness, for man cannot be confined within its limitations or be enslaved by its mechanics – he is more than the “computer” that operates for him.

So what about the themes of language and communication we explored in part 1? We will return to these in our next post. Until then, peace…