The Judas Factor; Part IV

At this point in Harold’s assessment of Judas and his role in the gospels, he makes a startling interpretation of a well-known scripture that has always been attributed to Jesus:

Judas, the despised, rejected of all, the one lost that the Scriptures be fulfilled, that nature’s supreme law might be fulfilled to the last iota – Judas, an utter revulsion to the elect upon whom fell the task of building Christianity – is he not the stone that the builders rejected? Scripture says:

The stone that the builders rejected is the chief stone now of the corner: this is the doing of the Lord, and a wonder to our eyes?…

The stone that the builders rejected is the chief stone now of the corner. Everyone who falls on that stone will be shattered, and whoever falls upon it will be crushed.

rejected-stone

Although the early church used this Psalm as a prophecy of Jesus’ resurrection, Preston Harold gives us good reason as to why we might interpret it as referring to Judas.

A stone is matter. Matter is head of the corner of the building – the temple of life, the body. Most precious to man, the inherent and first necessity of life, is matter of his own. Yet this “stone” – flesh and its demands – is seen to be evil. Money is mammon’s symbol, and mammon is seen as evil. With matter and money Judas is completely identified. Was it not Judas upon who the crushing stone fell – was not the Judas drama the doing of the Lord?

It’s hard for me to argue with this reasoning. Yet a lifetime of interpreting this scripture as referring to Jesus presses back onto me. Harold continues:

As one views the whole picture, it would appear to say that there is one among the elect of consciousness, the superego, who gathers and disperses matter. At the command of Authority-Ego, this factor moves to convert this experience in life into “hard coin.” This member of the household that betrays to death can find solace only in death, but through its action One’s mission in life is completed and he gives back the “mammon” he has taken unto himself Jesus says:

And I tell you use mammon, dishonest as it is…

He who is faithful with a trifle is also faithful with a large trust, and he who is dishonest with a trifle is also dishonest with a large trust….So if you are not faithful with dishonest mammon, how can you ever be trusted with true riches? And if you are not faithful with what belongs to another, how can you ever be given what is your own?

quote-a-man-cannot-serve-god-and-mammon-nor-be-temperate-and-furious-at-the-same-time-mahatma-gandhi-128-90-14

Mammon is dishonest because matter is not what it appears to be – it is but a trifle of mass. Judas had been faithful with the “trifle” of keeping the purse; Jesus could depend upon him to be faithful in executing the large trust involved in His betrayal and its aftermath – essential to His work. This world’s wealth, or matter, is not actually man’s own, but God’s. In this stewardship man must prove himself capable of using wealth before he can be given true riches – matter of his own.

Until next time, peace.

The Judas Factor; Part II

maxresdefault

To continue with our thread of thought from the last installment, we must remember that Preston Harold understands Jesus’ ministry as an enactment of the drama of light in the quantum realm. Harold tells us that

Jesus, Light, stays in consciousness long enough to determine the load upon the elect-ones, then retires into the unconscious domain. Jesus appears to have “fixed the load” upon Judas, to have cast him in the role of the one measure the system “loses” in the course of time.

The loss of this measure appears to be directly concerned with the acquisition of matter or the conversion of energy to matter, and the return of matter to the field or into a field, for Judas was involved with matter in keeping the purse, and he was handed the sop of bitter herbs or bread, “my body,” my matter, as the signal to collect his reward in silver – precious matter. Of his own volition, Judas finished himself – into matter, and the silver was returned to “purchase” a potter’s field.

judas_picture_1335558166_600x275

It is incredible to me how accurately the drama of Jesus and Judas represents the activity of light and the quantum field. Once the parallels are uncovered as Harold masterfully does here, one cannot help but wonder at the precision of the symbolism with which the gospel writers conveyed the story. Judas’ purse and silver as his matter and his giving himself over to it; how could it be otherwise? The inevitability, the destiny of it all is stunning. Any thinking person cannot help but be moved, not just by the accuracy of the parallel here between science and religion, but also by the emotional toll placed upon Judas. Even Jesus stated that His handing over must take place, but woe to the one who does the deed: “And The Son of Man goes just as it is written about him, but woe to that man by whom The Son of Man is betrayed; it would have been better for that man if he had not been born.” –Matt:26:24

The mystery of Judas touches many thinking men. (Ernest) Renan says:

“Without denying that Judas of Kerioth may have contributed to the arrest of his Master, we still believe that the curses with which he is loaded are somewhat unjust….if the foolish desire for a few pieces of silver turned the head of poor Judas, he does not seem to have lost the moral sentiment completely, since when he had seen the consequences of his fault he repented, and, it is said, killed himself.”

In our next post we will delve further into the inevitability and destiny of Judas’ deed. Until then, peace.

The FitzGerald Contraction

150px-George_Francis_FitzGerald

George Francis Fitzgerald

Have you ever heard of the FitzGerald Contraction? I never had until I read The Shining Stranger. Albert Einstein worked it into his theory of relativity. Sir Arthur Eddington explains it:

“Suppose that you have a rod moving at very high speed. Let it first be pointing transverse to its line of motion. Now turn it through a right angle so that it is along the line of motion. The rod contracts. It is shorter when it is along the line of motion than when it is across the line of motion. This contraction, known as the FitzGerald Contraction, is exceedingly small in all ordinary circumstances. It does not depend at all on the material of the rod but only on the speed. For example, if the speed is 19 miles a second – the speed of the earth around the sun – the contraction of length is 1 part in 200,000,000, or 2-1/2 inches in the diameter of the earth.”

Preston Harold interprets this for us:

The FitzGerald Contraction is a property of matter, of evil’s, or the Serpent’s domain. As one draws a poetic parallel, one must consider that by resisting, one is apt to turn evil transverse to its line of motion, thereby elongating or elaborating it.

Jesus said, “resist not evil…Love your enemies…pray for them which despitefully use you…” In effect, only by taking a line transverse to evil’s line will you outmeasure it.

Eddington says the FitzGerald Contraction is “the same for a rod of steel and for a rod of india-rubber; the rigidity and the compressing stress are bound up with the constitution in such a way that if one is large so also is the other.” Jesus states the psychic parallel – “Wherefore I say unto you, her sins, which are many, are forgiven; for she loved much: but to whom little is forgiven, the same loves little.” If the one aspect is large so is the other.

Evil is symbolized by the serpent whose line of motion is along the line of earth’s, horizontal. But man, the only true biped, posed himself uprightly- alone in all the world, threw himself transverse the “natural” line, became a vertical being, in truth measuring more than he was and more than evil measures, As he moves along evil’s path, the natural path, he also moves transverse to it, creating within himself, poetically speaking, a sphere that is independent of either line of motion because it is at once both and neither, as is the point where the vertical crosses the horizontal: +.

It is at this point that we must step aside and look more into the world of the serpent. We will do that in our next installment. Until then, peace.